Blog

Do you want to update your flooring at home but not sure what look to go for? We've got just the advice you need.

Flooring specialists, Posh Flooring, have predicted the biggest flooring trends for summer 2017 by analysing Google trends data, Pinterest trends and industry knowledge.

As we previously revealed, we're moving towards more creative and statement floorboards, and this certainly won't change in the next few seasons.

Stephen Gillen, head of marketing at Posh Flooring, said: 'We are seeing a move towards homeowners becoming more creative, daring and original with their décor. This trend is reflected in the flooring our customers are choosing. People are opting for parquet patterns and bolder colours, for example.'

So, take...

Read more

temp-post-image

Read more

temp-post-image

Hardwood Flooring Trends
Wider planks. Darker colors. Richer tones. And more natural looks that showcase wood’s inherent textures and grains. These are just a few of the latest trends in hardwood flooring that are opening up a whole new world of design possibilities – and offering today’s hardwood flooring consumers more options than ever before to showcase their personal style.
Following are some of the top hardwood flooring trends.

Wider, Longer Planks

When choosing new hardwood flooring, homeowners can now choose from wider planks, such as 5”, 6”, or even 7” planks over the traditional 2-1/4” to 3-1/2” wide planks. Wider planks visually open up a small space and can create a more spacious visual, making them an excellent option for living rooms, master bedrooms, or any section of the home. Many wide planks are now also available in longer lengths – up to as much as 6 feet, producing an even smoother-looking floor with fewer seams. Wide planks can be installed horizontally, vertically, or even diagonally – for a more dramatic look. While there is still a strong market for more traditional narrower planks, the wide-plank trend seems to be on the rise, with some newer products offered in planks as wide as 10 and 12 inches.

Gray Tones

Gray has gained popularity in recent years as the perfect “neutral” tone for walls, carpeting, and tile. So it only makes sense that gray tones are now one of the hottest options in hardwood flooring. A trend that started on the West Coast and has now been fully embraced by the East, gray hardwood flooring is the perfect way to modernize an outdated room. Gray tones can range from light neutrals to deep saturated charcoals.
So why are grays so popular? Gray tones bring out the beauty of natural wood, highlighting the grains and texture, which adds visual interest to a room, allowing the flooring to be a true statement piece. While at the same time, neutral gray tones won’t overpower a room and will compliment many decorating styles.

temp-post-image

Darker Woods

Want to make a bolder statement? Consider the trend toward darker stain colors, such as ebony, for a rich and contemporary look. Or for a more traditional feel, consider a deep, warm Jacobean or dark Walnut. Or maybe go with a Royal Mahogany stain to combine the richness of ebony with the warmth of a red wood – for a truly sophisticated look.
One thing is clear. Consumers are no longer limited to selections of varying shades of brown only. Today’s hardwood flooring is all about color – and the deeper and darker the color, the bolder the design impact. Dark hardwoods, such as oak, cherry, and walnut, are perfect choices for creating this sleek, dark look.

temp-post-image

Lime-Washed Woods

On the other end of the color spectrum is an old white-wash technique that originated in high-end European flooring but has been embraced in the U.S. Known as lime-wash or pickling, the original technique used a mixture of lime and water, applied to the wood to soften the natural color and create a white-washed effect. Today, similar techniques use a much less-caustic liming wax to fade and age the appearance of woods such as oak and ash, giving them a more coastal feel. A great decorating option in shore homes, lime-washed wood flooring is also used in a variety of decors ranging from formal to rustic.

temp-post-image

Differing Gloss Levels
While many traditional high-gloss wood flooring options continue to be in demand, the latest trend on the market represents a definite shift toward less-shiny, low-gloss floors, which offer several benefits. Woods with low-luster hide small scratches and dents better than higher-gloss flooring – a real plus for pet owners and those with small children. Low-gloss flooring also does a better job at masking dust and buildup from footprints, making it much easier to maintain and clean and a perfect option for high-traffic areas. But one of the biggest appeals of low-gloss flooring is that it offers a more authentic wood look, often highlighting the color and texture of the wood more effectively than a high-shine finish.
Low-luster flooring is continuing to gain popularity in North America, where many wood products are now offered with gloss levels as low as 30%. As this trend continues, expect to see even lower-luster finishes.

Vintage Style

Old is new again – and one of the strongest trends in hardwood flooring continues to be the move toward more authentic-looking wood. Think of the rustic feel of homes built in the 1700s, 1800s, and the early 1900s with the knotty pine, maple, and hickory that reveals wood’s natural graining, color variations, and true character. For the niche market looking for that antique vibe, we will continue to see domestic hardwoods that are intentionally distressed to provide an aged look. Aging techniques such as handscraping, which as the name implies, involves literally using a tool to scrape the wood by hand, will continue to be a popular. But as distressing technologies evolve, expect to see softer textures emerge.

temp-post-image

Wire-Brushed Woods

Wire-brushed textures are also a leading trend with consumers. This technique uses a wire-brush to scrape off the soft top layer of the wood, leaving only the hardest wood and exposing more of the wood's natural grains and texture. Wire-brushed floors (also referred to as wire scraped) are generally much harder and less likely to show chips, scratches, and scrapes. Accidental scratches from pets' claws or furniture legs are more easily camouflaged on these floors since they tend to blend in with the natural wire-brushed patterns. Wire-brushed woods have particular market appeal in coastal areas, where the technique is often applied to white and light-gray woods for a more “beachy” feel.

temp-post-image

Reclaimed/Recycled Woods

Even more distinctly aged and eco-friendly is flooring made from reclaimed or recycled woods, a trend that is especially appealing to today’s green consumers. The term reclaimed wood covers all previously manufactured wood products that are now either being reused as is or are remanufactured into new products. Reclaimed hardwood flooring may include solid wood sourced from old barns, farmhouses, beams, and wood barrels, as well as logs salvaged from rivers and lakes. Variations in board lengths (typically longer and wider planks), knots, heavy graining, original nail markings, and color differences all add to the charm of this one-of-a-kind flooring.
In reviewing these trends, one thing is clear: today’s hardwood flooring consumers are looking for more personality from their hardwood floors. And with new technologies continuing to emerge in the hardwood flooring industry, there are more options available than ever before to suit a wide range of consumer tastes and styles.

temp-post-image

Read more

Given the wide array of flooring options available, you're bound to find one that fits your lifestyle and budget. Learn about 10 popular flooring types to find your match

Today’s choices in flooring are more varied than ever, running the gamut of styles, finishes and installation options. Product innovation is clearly blurring the lines between many flooring categories, and the raw materials used to create flooring types include gin bottles, corn sugar and the staves from old wine barrels. The winner in this underfoot mash-up is the consumer, who benefits from an astonishing array of choices that fit any lifestyle and budget.

temp-post-image

Wood
Hardwood flooring is renowned for its natural beauty and durability. Its classic good looks harmonize with any architectural theme or interior design, and it’s an especially good choice to create visual room-to-room continuity for homes with open floor plans.
Hardwood flooring comes as strips 1-1/2 to 2-1/2 inches wide or planks 4 to 8 inches wide. Domestic species include oak, maple and black walnut. Regional varieties, such as pecan, chinquapin and mesquite, are not widely distributed but offer distinctive grain patterns.
The availability of exotic species of hardwoods varies with market conditions, and popular imported varieties include Brazilian cherry, purpleheart, and African pedauk. To make sure the wood flooring you buy is harvested from sustainable, managed forests, look for certification from the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) and the SFI (Sustainable Forest Initiative).
Coatings for prefinished hardwood have benefited from technological advancements, and finishes may include additives such as ceramics, aluminum oxide, and acrylic monomers that produce incredibly tough surfaces.

Solid wood must be nailed to a subfloor. An advantage of solid wood is that it can be refinished many times over its lifespan.
Hardwood costs $3 to $8 per square foot, and exotic varieties may be as high as $14 per square foot. Expect to pay $5 to $12 per square foot for professional installation.

temp-post-image

Engineered Wood
Engineered wood features a top veneer of real wood backed by layers of cheaper plywood. This construction makes the flooring more stable and much less susceptible to changes in temperature and humidity than solid wood.
Instead of plywood backing, some newer varieties have substrates made from recycled wood fiber mixed with stone dust to provide extreme dimensional stability. Engineered wood is a good choice for kitchens and basements, as well as for installation over in-floor heating systems.
Engineered wood can be nailed, glued or installed as a floating floor over a cushioned pad. More manufacturers are producing self-locking, or “clickable,” engineered wood flooring that installs without glue or nails. Clickable flooring comes as planks or parquet squares and makes a good DIY project. Prices are comparable to solid wood

temp-post-image

Bamboo
This increasingly popular flooring material is often thought of as wood, although it isn’t a hardwood but a grass. Bamboo strands are glued together to form solid strips or engineered planks, just like hardwood. Cost to purchase and install are comparable to wood products.
Grain patterns include flat, vertical and woven. Flat grains display the intermittent growth nodes characteristic of the grass; vertical grains pack the strands closely together to produce a fine-grained appearance. Woven types have sinewy patterns.
Bamboo is tough and durable. Because it comes from plants that are easy to grow and regenerate quickly, bamboo is considered a sustainable material and an environmentally friendly flooring choice. Nevertheless, most bamboo is imported from Asia, and environmentalists point to the energy required to transport bamboo to the U.S. as a factor to consider when selecting green flooring.
Expect to pay $3 to $8 per square foot for bamboo flooring, and $7 to $12 per square foot installed.

temp-post-image

Laminate

Low-maintenance laminate flooring offers an enormous variety of styles, colors and patterns. It's similar to engineered wood in that a top wear layer is backed by layers of plywood or compressed fiber backing that is extremely stable. The big difference is that the top layer is not real wood but a plastic coating applied over a photograph. The photo-realism technology that’s used produces look-alike finishes indistinguishable from real wood and other materials such as stone, ceramic tile, even stained concrete.

Laminates comes as planks or tiles. Most are floating floor systems, meaning they can be installed directly over old existing flooring without glue or nails — no tear-out is necessary. Laminate is a popular DIY flooring, but it’s wise not to overestimate your skills — installing around corners and between door jambs takes patience and ingenuity.
Quality varies, and laminate flooring costs $1 to $7 per square foot. Installation adds $2 to $5 per square foot, depending on difficulty.

temp-post-image

Linoleum
Linoleum is made with renewable, biodegradable materials including linseed oil and cork. Mineral pigments are added to produce rich, vibrant colors. Linoleum produces no harmful vapors and is considered a top environmentally friendly flooring choice.
Linoleum comes as sheet goods designed for glue-down installation and as laminated planks and tiles that install as a floating floor system. Some manufacturers provide a protective coating that prevents staining and helps the product stand up to foot traffic. Linoleum without this coating should be refinished every two years.
Expect to pay $2 to $5 per square foot and $7 to $12 per square foot installed.

temp-post-image

Cork
Cork comes from the bark of a tree. The bark is harvested every eight to 10 years and is a sustainable material, meaning the tree is not destroyed but is allowed to regenerate new bark that can be harvested repeatedly. Typically, cork-producing countries regulate production to ensure future harvests, so the impact on the environment is low.
Cork has a warm, natural appearance and is comfortable underfoot. It has unusual grain patterns featuring whirls and speckles. It comes in tiles or planks with a laminate construction — a top wear layer glued to a stable core material. Cork flooring is either glued down or installed as a floating floor. Cork flooring costs $2 to $6 per square foot; add $3 to $5 per square foot for installation.
Most cork flooring products are prefinished; however, they should be resealed every few years to renew the wear layer, guard against stains and seal out moisture. Polyurethane and wax are both good sealers for cork. Buy water-based polyurethane that’s nontoxic or has low volatile organic compound content.
Ceramic Tile
The many shapes, sizes, colors and textures of ceramic tile make it easy to create custom, one-of-a-kind patterns. Cost varies widely, and you’ll find tile priced anywhere from $1 to $100 per square foot. Complementary decorative trim pieces and mosaic inlays quickly raise the total price of a tile installation. Expect to pay experienced tile-setters $4 to $12 per square foot.
Ceramic tile is made from a mixture of clay and shale that is baked and hardened in a kiln. Dry pigments added to the mixture gives the tiles earthy tones that range from ocher to deep red. Be sure to purchase only tile that is rated for use on floors.
Ceramic flooring tile comes as one of four basic types:
Glazed ceramic has a glasslike coating that is applied prior to firing. The coating gives the tile an unlimited variety of colors and textures and makes the material virtually maintenance-free.
Quarry tile is unglazed ceramic tile. Colors come from pigments added to the clay mixture. Quarry tile has a slightly rough texture that provides better slip-resistance than glazed tile.
Porcelain tile is fired at extremely high temperatures. The result is a tile that’s especially hard and durable. Porcelain tile is resistant to staining and is a good choice for exterior applications. It's available either glazed or unglazed.
Terracotta is an unglazed tile with earthy colors and rustic appearance. It is not as durable as other tiles and must be sealed periodically to prevent staining.
Some ceramic floor tiles come with an anti-slip finish that provides excellent traction even when wet. Choose tiles that meet the slip-resistance standards of the Americans With Disabilities Act.

Carpet
Carpeting is one of the most versatile of all flooring options, featuring more colors and textures than any other type of flooring. When judging carpet quality, a simple rule of thumb is to ask about the density of the fibers used to make the carpet — the more fibers per square inch, the more durable the carpet.
Most carpeting is made by pulling the fibers through a woven backing; then additional layers of backing are glued on to provide strength and thickness. A carpet pad adds cushioning and helps prolong the life of the carpet. Indoor/outdoor carpeting withstands weather and usually is installed without a pad.
Some carpets use a rating system that indicates the product’s ability to withstand wear and tear. Found on the carpet label, the system is graduated from 1 to 5, with 5 being the best. A rating of 3 to 4 is considered normal.
Carpeting costs $2 to $12 per square foot. Add 50 cents to $2 per square foot for padding and installation, depending on the complexity of the job.
Wool carpeting is the standard of quality. It's naturally durable and resistant to moisture and stains, and it’s considered to have the best feel against hands and bare feet. With the exception of wool, most carpets are made of synthetic fibers. Various types include the following:
Nylon is exceptionally strong and resistant to wear. Make sure the carpet you buy is treated to reduce static electricity.
Acrylic has physical properties that approximate wool. It resists wear, crushing and mildew, and it’s inhospitable for insects.
Polyester produces bright colors and is highly resistant to moisture, but stains can be difficult to remove.
Polypropylene olefin is used for indoor/outdoor carpeting. It's extremely resistant to stains, moisture and mildew.

Stone
If you’re looking for a little touch of luxury, stone floor tile provides quality, at a premium price. You’ll pay from $2 to $100 per square foot for natural stone tiles made of granite, marble, limestone, slate and travertine. Installation adds $5 to $10 per square foot.
The ability of stone to resist moisture and staining depends on its hardness. Softer stones such as sandstone and limestone must be finished every few years with a stone sealer. Harder stones, such as granite and marble, should be sealed every four to five years.
Honed and polished stone tile can be slippery when wet, so choose stone that has a textured, skid-resistant surface for kitchens and master bath applications.

Vinyl
Vinyl tiles and sheet goods are called resilient flooring — they're flexible and slightly soft underfoot. They're tough, durable and virtually maintenance-free. Vinyl comes in an array of colors and patterns at relatively modest cost. Although you’ll pay as little as $1 per square foot, there are fewer style options among the less-expensive types.

Vinyl products are backed with a layer of felt. Cushioned vinyl is backed with a thin layer of foam that offers an extra measure of comfort and safety. In general, a thicker vinyl surface means better quality and higher price. Thicker vinyl can have a textured surface that looks like real stone and wood.
Vinyl flooring has a wear layer on its upper surface that helps resist stains and scratches. The best vinyl products provide warranties on the wear layer of as much as 15 years, and you can expect good-quality vinyl to last 20 years.
Vinyl tiles and sheet goods cost $1 to $5 per square foot. Installation adds $1 to $2 per square foot, depending on the complexity of the project.

temp-post-image

Read more

temp-post-image

Read more

Read more

Wood must be one of humanity’s oldest natural resources. It has helped keep us safe, comfortable and warm for millions of years. But trees graced our beautiful blue planet long before our ancestors were a twinkle in the universe’s eye. Imagine a world with absolutely no human-generated noise, mess or disruption, just endless seas of gently-waving trees and plants as far as the eye can see. It would be a splendid and moving sight.

We’ve used wood for so long that most of us don’t really ‘see’ it any more. It’s part of the cultural scenery. But in the same way the starry night sky blows your mind with its eternal vastness, looking at a tree with fresh eyes brings its miraculous nature back into foc...

Read more

Homeowners in general, are looking for ways that they can make their home more environmentally friendly, especially if they are planning on doing any renovations.
If you are installing new flooring in your home, then you may want to consider using a sustainable flooring material. Don’t let the cost of using sustainable flooring deter you – in many cases, sustainable materials are actually more affordable – and even manage to add value to your home!
The following are five different sustainable flooring materials to consider:
1. Bamboo Flooring

temp-post-image

Bamboo flooring has become a very popular alternative to hardwood, in part because of its environmentally friendly qualities. Bamboo is a very sustainable source. This is because bamboo is actually a grass – and a fast-growing one at that.
Additionally, bamboo thrives in practically any climate, which is why it can be found in many products such as bamboo sleep products, bamboo furniture, bamboo kitchenware, etc. But it’s incredible sustainability isn’t the only draw.
The following are a few of the other benefits that bamboo has to offer:
Bamboo flooring has a similarly elegant aesthetic as hardwood, which is why it’s become such as popular alternative.
Bamboo is extremely durable and long-lasting, in some cases just as durable and long lasting as hardwood.
Bamboo flooring is surprisingly affordable considering its quality.
Bamboo flooring is easy to take care of as long as you sweep it regularly.
Bamboo flooring that is scratched or has become discolored can simply be refinished

2. Cork Flooring

temp-post-image

Cork is a relatively new type of flooring material that is slowly becoming a more popular option for homeowners. Cork is a material that is produced from the bark of a cork tree.
The reason that it is such a sustainable material is that the cork tree doesn’t need to be killed in order to harvest the bark – it can simply be stripped from the tree. The bark will regrow within three years, which means it’s a renewable source. Not to mention that cork trees are commonly found throughout Mediterranean forests. In addition to being a sustainable material, cork has plenty of other benefits.
These advantages include:
Cork has anti-microbial properties, which means it’s perfect for anyone with allergies as it is extremely resistant to dust and toxin absorption as well as mold and mildew.
Cork is soft yet durable, making it comfortable to walk on.
Cork has insulative properties that help it to retain heat, which means your floors won’t get cold during the winter.
Cork has a very unique and beautiful look that makes it a good fit for contemporary and modern interior designs.

3. Reclaimed Hardwood Flooring

temp-post-image

Traditional hardwood is not very environmentally friendly. Even if you purchase your wood from a farm that practices sustainable growing practices, trees must be completely cut down in order to harvest the wood – and they can take decades to grow back into maturity. But hardwood has a certain allure to it because of its timeless quality. If hardwood is something that you have your heart set on, consider reclaimed hardwood.
Reclaimed hardwood is hardwood that is reused from existing sources. For example, the wood siding from an old barn that was torn down. Basically, you’re salvaging wood for the use of your floors.
The following are a few of the additional benefits of using reclaimed hardwood:
Reclaimed hardwood provides a unique look to your home, not just because of its timeless quality but also because of the additional character that salvaged wood tends to have.
Reclaimed hardwood is extremely durable – more so than regular hardwood even. This is because the wood came from old-growth trees instead of first-generation forests that new hardwood typically comes from.
Reclaimed hardwood will last a lifetime. Once you’ve installed reclaimed hardwood, you can expect it to last as long as you live – provided that you care for it.
Reclaimed hardwood is easy to keep clean as long as you sweep and vacuum on a regular basis.

4. Rubber Flooring

temp-post-image

Believe it or not, but rubber flooring is a thing. It’s actually been used quite often in commercial spaces, such as gyms and hospitals, because of its durability as well as its ergonomics. But it’s also a very environmentally friendly choice.
First of all, you can use rubber flooring produced out of recycled rubber products, such as tires. Secondly, rubber won’t hurt your indoor air quality since it doesn’t emit nearly as many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or other carcinogenic substances as other flooring materials.
Last but not least, rubber comes from a sustainable source – it’s a raw material that is produced from the sap that is extracted from tropical rubber trees. Rubber flooring has a lot of other things going for it as well. Some of its benefits include:
Rubber is low-maintenance since you can easily sweep or mop the surface and because it is resistant to stains.
Rubber has a naturally flexible nature that makes it a more supportive surface to stand on.
Rubber flooring is non-porous, making it resistant to moisture. This means that rubber flooring is a particularly good option for kitchens, bathrooms and laundry rooms.
Rubber flooring is available in all kinds of colors and patterns.
Rubber is extremely durable and long lasting due to its high density.

5. Vinyl Flooring

temp-post-image

A lot of people don’t realize that linoleum flooring is actually a very environmentally friendly flooring option. In fact, you might have even thought the opposite. This misconception often comes to be because of the idea that linoleum is similar to vinyl, which is a synthetic material that isn’t environmentally friendly in the slightest.
However, linoleum is, because it is made out of sustainable materials that include linseed oil, tree resins, wood flour, cork dust, ground limestone and pigments. Not only are these materials natural, they are all biodegradable.
In addition to coming from a sustainable source, linoleum flooring also provides the following benefits:
Linoleum flooring is extremely durable due to its coating, which makes it an excellent choice for high-traffic parts of the home as well as in commercial spaces.
Linoleum is a very visually flexible material because it can be manufactured to look like other flooring materials, including wood and stone.
Linoleum is one of the most affordable of all flooring materials.
Linoleum flooring is easy to maintain. You can sweep or mop it without worry since it is resistant to moisture, which is why it’s often used in kitchen spaces.
While there are a lot of different factors to consider when choosing flooring material, one factor that you should really put some thought into is the sustainability of the material. These are five flooring materials that are not only environmentally friendly options, but that have numerous other benefits as well.

source:http://www.lifehack.org/494467/5-environmentally-friendly-flooring-options

Read more

Hardwood flooring is one of the most popular floor surface covering materials, and has been for centuries. This is due to its versatility of function and design, as well as an inherent natural charm that gives each installation a unique personality and beauty.Softwoods and HardwoodsSoftwood Flooring: This includes materials harvested from a variety of trees, most commonly Pine, Fir, and Cedar. These species tend to mature very quickly, and are readily abundant. However their rapid growth leads to the wood itself being less dense, and therefore less durable. This can make it susceptible to dents and scratches. It also makes it harder to refinish, as low spots can rapidly be created by sanding machines.Despite these drawbacks many people s...

Read more

So you know you want the warmth and beauty of hardwood flooring in your home. You’re just not sure which one you should purchase for your space -- there are so many great options out there to choose from!Hardwood flooring can be a big investment. It’s a decision you don’t want to make lightly. To help you out, here are 6 factors to consider when choosing which hardwood flooring type is right for you.1. ColorHardwood flooring comes in a range of colors, from the lightest of pines, to the darkest of walnuts. The color of hardwood flooring you choose can help create a specific style for your space.For instance, if rustic is your thing, take a look at some of the lighter-toned woods like Caribbean Heart Pine, Australian Cyp...

Read more

Contact